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PRESS RELEASE – INTENDED FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Aerometals Renews Call for Public Comment to FAA

 

 
PRESS CONTACT:
YES Communications, Inc.
Kelley Parlier
972.768.0857 cell
 
 
Lyn Burks, Editor in Chief
 

 

23 March 2016- Sacramento, CA
Faced with the prospect of increasing Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) scrutiny and policy changes for future Inlet Barrier Filter (IBF) development standards, Aerometals (formerly FDC/Aerofilter) continues to encourage aircraft owners, operators and concerned aviation professionals to respond to the FAA proposed policy statement No. PS-ASW-27/29-7.  A recent extension for public comment submittal extends the due date to April 15, 2016 and can be found at https://www.faa.gov/aircraft/draft_docs/policy/. The FAA Policy Statement on Certification of Engine IBF Installations on Rotorcraft contemplates new and what Aerometals considers unrealistic certification guidance and a threat to the very future of any new developments.
 
During a meeting held at this year’s Helicopter Association International (HAI) Heli-Expo in Louisville, KY, Lance Gant, Rotorcraft Directorate Manager, stated “Inlet Barrier Filters are nothing but goodness when operating in certain parts of the world.”  Furthermore, Mr. Gant confirmed that the current certification standards have not resulted in any “unsafe conditions”.  When asked about the intent of the proposed policy change, the FAA was unable to answer why the new policy was under consideration with no evidence of an unsafe condition.
 
Two primary U.S. STC holders have produced over 7000 IBF systems over the last twenty years with over 20 million flight hours flown - all with no reported incidents or accidents directly related to an IBF system. Early systems were developed to protect military turbine engines operating in harsh environments and later adapted to provide the same safety and power margin protection for civil applications. IBF systems are known to significantly reduce erosion and damage as well as operating costs for turbine engines.  Both companies have stated that aftermarket IBF development will stop leaving only OEM involvement if this proposed policy statement is adopted.
 

 

Aerometals submitted an initial FAA Supplemental Type Certification (STC) application in March of 2012 for an IBF system for the Sikorsky S-92 and has yet to receive FAA approval after extensive testing and burdensome new methods of compliance following an FAA “issue paper” outlining over 90 new requirements. The company has several other projects that have been halted because of changing FAA guidance under unclear circumstances including the EC2135T2/T2+ and the H130. Aerometals contends that the FAA continues to obstruct IBF business with unrealistic demands under no clear or admitted reasons for the changes to an already rigorous and time-consuming certification process. Aircraft owners and operators continue to wait for new engine protection systems under development with no clear approval timeframe.  For further information please contact John Holland, Director of Sales at john.holland@aerometals.aero.
 
 
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About Aerometals:

 

Aerometals is a privately held company with extensive experience manufacturing parts for civil and military aircraft as well as an extensive PMA product line for MD Helicopter model types.   The company also manufactures and develops engine inlet barrier filter products for a multitude of light single engine helicopters, light and medium twin helicopters and transport category helicopters. For additional information regarding Aerometals and the company’s extensive aerospace manufacturing capabilities, please visit www.aerometals.aero or call 916.939.6888.